Home » Aspects of the Social Problem by Helen Dendy
Aspects of the Social Problem Helen Dendy

Aspects of the Social Problem

Helen Dendy

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230379203
Paperback
110 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... XIV SOME CONTROVERTEDMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... XIV SOME CONTROVERTED POINTS IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF POOR RELIEF1 By C. S. Loch It may be of interest to readers of the Economic Journal, if I discuss somewhat more fully than has yet been done the views expressed by Professor Marshall on the subject of the Poor Law and Poor Relief in the March and September numbers of the Journal last year.2 I do not propose to myself to examine them all exhaustively, but to pick out a few statements and to set against them evidence which appears to me to be entitled to consideration. Statement I. The principle that public relief should be adjusted simply to the indigence of the applicant has remained without substantial change during sixty years in which our views on most social problems have changed much. It had its origin in the great dread that overspread the nation as a result of the ruinous folly of the old Poor Law. The principle that public relief should be administered 1 From the Economic Journal for September and December 1893. 2 For a further statement of Professor Marshalls views on this subject see his speech at the last meeting of the British Economic Association, Economic Journal, No. II, p. 389. Note by Editor of Economic Journal. according to the destitution of the applicant and not on the ground of poverty did not originate in the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. It is to be found in the Act of Queen Elizabeth, a departure from the terms of which was. one chief reason for the ruinous folly, etc. That Act provides for setting to work the children of those who shall not be thought able to keep and maintain them--destitute children- for the setting to work of persons having no means to maintain themselves--destitute persons- and for the necessary relief of the lame, impotent, old, ...